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Hello From New Zealand
24-09-2011, 04:48 AM,
#1
Hello From New Zealand
I've been using PIC micros for many years, mostly assembly programming. I like the way Arduino works and its relative simplicity but do not want to use Atmel for a number of reasons (mostly my PIC experience and the trouble we have getting Atmel parts).

I came across Pinguino and thought it was a good merge of PIC and Arduino. One of the problems I have now is that I want to target other PIC chips, that do not have internal USB.

I also need to get 2 or 3 quite complex Arduino projects running on PIC. I am not sure yet how I will go about this. I have looked at adding the PIC18F2525 and PIC16F88 to Pinguino, which may be good for Pinguino. But at the moment I am thinking that it may be easier to convert the Arduino projects direct to C.

I will expand on this later and see how it goes.

Paul
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24-09-2011, 10:08 AM,
#2
RE: Hello From New Zealand
Hi Paul, welcome !
SDCC works not so good with PIC16F so I think there will be no port to this kind of chip. I don't know the PIC18F2525 but it could be possible to use it with a serial bootloader. We just need someone to do it ;o). For your information, PIC18f26j50 is on our roadmap.
Maybe we can help you with your complex Arduino project ? I am interesting in the difficulties you will get to improve Pinguino.
Regis.
PS: New Zealand vs. France starts in 30mn, May the best team win !

(24-09-2011, 04:48 AM)PMB-NZ Wrote: I've been using PIC micros for many years, mostly assembly programming. I like the way Arduino works and its relative simplicity but do not want to use Atmel for a number of reasons (mostly my PIC experience and the trouble we have getting Atmel parts).

I came across Pinguino and thought it was a good merge of PIC and Arduino. One of the problems I have now is that I want to target other PIC chips, that do not have internal USB.

I also need to get 2 or 3 quite complex Arduino projects running on PIC. I am not sure yet how I will go about this. I have looked at adding the PIC18F2525 and PIC16F88 to Pinguino, which may be good for Pinguino. But at the moment I am thinking that it may be easier to convert the Arduino projects direct to C.

I will expand on this later and see how it goes.

Paul

It is easier to complain than it is to do, but it is better to do than it is to complain.
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25-09-2011, 01:57 PM,
#3
RE: Hello From New Zealand
Hello regis

Thanks for the reply.
I think the PIC18F2525 is a like the PIC18F2550 just without the USB. I thought the PIC16F88 may be more of a challenge. It is quite a nice chip and I have used a lot of them over the years.

Most of what I design is using small to medium PIC micros. I have just completed 2 projects based on PIC12F675 that operate for very long periods on 3V battery power.
I think it is now time that I use a higher level language and the Arduino compatibility should make it easier for others to take part.

I have three more complex applications in mind and already have the hardware:
1. flight stability controller
2. video on-screen-display (very timing sensitive will likely include assembly ISRs)
3. frequency hopping radio link controller (PIC16F88)

Another application I have is for a small logic relay controller that has simple function and low cost, so it only needs a PIC16F chip. I would like it to be Arduino compatible so that it is as easy as possible for others to program and use. For this I would normally program in assembler and use a PIC16F676, but this is very difficult for less experienced users and would not be popular.

I have considered switching to STM32 ARM chips for the more complex projects, which I can get cheaper than PIC16F chips. But the small packages lower voltages make the PCB and support circuitry more complex and expensive for relatively simple applications. In the end, continuing with PIC seems reasonable and I think Pingunio has a lot of potential.

I have been using Kubuntu Linux for almost everything for some time. PikLab looked like a good idea but seems buggy and crashes quite often, so I still run MPLAB as a ICSP programmer only.

Paul

(24-09-2011, 10:08 AM)regis Wrote: Hi Paul, welcome !
SDCC works not so good with PIC16F so I think there will be no port to this kind of chip. I don't know the PIC18F2525 but it could be possible to use it with a serial bootloader. We just need someone to do it ;o). For your information, PIC18f26j50 is on our roadmap.
Maybe we can help you with your complex Arduino project ? I am interesting in the difficulties you will get to improve Pinguino.
Regis.
PS: New Zealand vs. France starts in 30mn, May the best team win !

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01-06-2012, 05:14 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-06-2012, 05:23 PM by funlw65.)
#4
RE: Hello From New Zealand
Serial bootloader
http://venus.ece.ndsu.nodak.edu/~glower/...loader.htm
Maybe it can be converted to SDCC (or to JALv2 for a smaller code size)...
Personally, I modified it to enter in boot mode by closing a jumper - it can be a switch (I used PICC18 Lite and MPLAB-X under Linux Mint). The problem is, once you entered in boot mode, your previous application code no longer exist - it get's erased. So, you must think twice before closing/hit boot jumper/button. But it is logical that way so I don/t see it as a real problem.
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08-06-2012, 03:11 PM,
#5
RE: Hello From New Zealand
Thank you for your comment. I have looked at the link.

I have completed several PIC projects since my last post here but have not made any pogress with Pinguino. I did install a newer version not long ago but a reported bug stopped it from working so I gave up.

I also have MPLAB-X installed under Kubuntu and it looks promising. It doesn't seem to support the ICD2 very well or at all (can't remember); I had to buy a PICKIT-3. The device programmer interface and control doesn't seem as good as the old MPLAB interface. Maybe it will improve or I will get used to it.

Some time ago I briefly looked at adding the non-USB PIC18F2525 to Pinguino; to an earlier version. But it was taking too long to sort out the structure and missing SDCC/tools files. I still think Pinguino has great possibilites, but as it supports only a couple of procesors via USB it is OK for one-off and classroom projects but still too limited for my use.

It is funny that students these days seem to think they need a 32 bit super-fast processor to flash a LED. A lot of simple mass produced products still use 8 and 4 bit processors that cost less and need only simple support.

I like that Arduino is simple but can do complex things, and can be dropped straight into a small $3 chip on your own board design. Only problem is, it's Atmel, and I can't get the chips reliably.

I still have the problem of "what to do". I cannot swap systems more than once. At this stage I am still using mostly assembler and will probably convert my Arduino projects to C and use MPLAB-X mostly to drive the programmer.

Paul
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